Understanding Split Pots in Poker (help)

Please, someone. Help me understand.

Me: Q 9
Him: 9 6

Both of us: 3 of a kind with 9s.

We split pot? Like, whut? How? isn't my Q9 clearly better? How many times have you lost a hand because of something like that, but in the clincher moments when you need it the most the game just decides to split the pot? Why is this so inconsistent?

Explain it to me like I'm a 5 year old, because clearly having a Master's degree doesn't make you smart.


Do Good - Die Great

Culigan

Member

what were the other cards on table ?
A and K maybe?

DL_David

Administrator

As Culigan was hinting at, the tie breaking card was likely on the table (higher values than in either of your hands) so you tied.  Only five cards are used in determining your hand and your opponent's hand.

DL_David wrote

As Culigan was hinting at, the tie breaking card was likely on the table (higher values than in either of your hands) so you tied.  Only five cards are used in determining your hand and your opponent's hand.

So if I am understanding you right, if there was an A or K on the table, which is better than my Q9 and his 96, we split?
*long dramatic sigh that goes on for eternity* lol...


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DL_David

Administrator

So there must have been two 9s on the table to make your three of a kind.  That leaves two more cards to break the tie. In order for it to be a tie the other two cards must have come from the table because otherwise the cards in your hand would beat your opponents and you would win.  If there was an AK on the table then the 9,9,<your 9>, A, K would be the five cards used to form your hand and your opponent's hand, and your Q and his 6 would be ignored.

Lambert444

Member

DL_David wrote

So there must have been two 9s on the table to make your three of a kind.  That leaves two more cards to break the tie. In order for it to be a tie the other two cards must have come from the table because otherwise the cards in your hand would beat your opponents and you would win.  If there was an AK on the table then the 9,9,<your 9>, A, K would be the five cards used to form your hand and your opponent's hand, and your Q and his 6 would be ignored.

Exactly, this must have been the scenario.